Animalkind By Ingrid Newkirk and Gene Stone

Animalkind By Ingrid Newkirk and Gene Stone
Animalkind By Ingrid Newkirk and Gene Stone

Animalkind Book Review By Ingrid Newkirk and Gene Stone

Some of my favorite Fruitive customers work just minutes from our Colley Avenue location in Norfolk, VA. They’re the kind, genuine plant-based staffers working at PETA’s national headquarters.

And today, PETA’s founder Ingrid Newkirk released her latest book, Animalkind: Remarkable Discoveries About Animals and Revolutionary New Ways to Show Them Compassion. Too impatient to wait for my copy to arrive in the mail, I listened to the audio version this evening.

Many of us know PETA for their polarizing ads, but Animalkind impresses me as Ingrid’s attempt to unite us. Its message is full of hope — and positive about the changes we can continue to make for a better world.

In the book’s first section, she celebrates all animals’ incredible intelligence with a detailed look at their capacity for empathy and love. I was amazed by her examples of how well they communicate with their own and other species.

In Animalkind’s second section, Ingrid examines the future of every issue surrounding animal welfare. Thanks to the obvious fascination and love for animals she displays from the first page to the last, I can’t wait to go on a nature walk today with a renewed appreciation for the surrounding birds and wildlife.

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