Fructose In Fruits And Vegetables

Fructose In Fruits And Vegetables

Fructose In Fruits And Vegetables

 

This morning, as one of my children was watching a YouTube video on my phone, an ad popped onto the screen. It featured a guy claiming he’d figured out THE secret to losing weight.

He hooked me with an all-caps graphic:

“LOSING WEIGHT DOES NOT MEAN SALADS THREE TIMES A DAY!”

We listened as the guy proclaimed, “The advice to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables is gravely flawed!” His reasoning?

Nobody, he said, can recommend eating fruit unless “they completely ignore fructose.” I told my son that the guy was just making a sales pitch. Unfortunately, he isn’t alone.

Too many people have accepted the false notion that the fructose in fruits and vegetables is bad for their health. To prove their point, proponents of the fruit- and veggie-free diet craze combine limited clinical evidence with a bit of conjecture.

Their approach is a spin on the low-carb fad in which advocates failed to distinguish between essential and refined carbohydrates. They lumped them together as “carbs” and, based on negative research about the refined ones, erroneously concluded that no carb is a good carb.

They seem to repeat the same trick, this time with fruits and vegetables. They overlook the fact that natural sugar in whole, unprocessed fruits and veggies comes with a host of other essential nutrients. As Dr. T Colin Campbell writes, “… sugar is only one nutrient-like chemical member of a vast array of nutrient-like substances in food.”

These nutrients work together to give our bodies exactly what is needed. The entire fruit package is perfectly balanced for human health!

When we alter a whole food’s natural structure, each individual nutrient, acting alone without its peers, may cause unintended consequences. Thus, fructose isn’t best for our bodies when subtracted from the fruit, but it is illogical to conclude that the whole fruit is bad because it contains fructose.

Dr. T Colin Campbell coined the phrase Whole-Food, Plant-Based. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. So don’t try to take the fructose out of my fruit.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest