Looking For Diet Truth

Looking For Diet Truth

Yesterday, I blogged on the confusion resulting frommedia reports on random studies of the same subject arriving at completely different conclusions. Specifically, should our daily diets include 2 tablespoons of olive oil, or no oil of any kind?

Once again, the mixed-message focus of my early August post The Tyranny of “The Latest Study” has reared its ugly head. I wrote then, “It’s rare for any medically researched subject to have 100 percent of the studies back a certain approach.”

Yesterday’s olive-oil-or-no-oil controversy is a case in point. Academic papers on the NBCI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) website alone contained3,634 mentions of olive oil just within the past year!

Did any of them mention that the health benefits of olive oil outweigh the health benefits of an oil-free diet? Honestly, who has the time to read, let alone the scientific background to understand, that amount of research?

The reality is that it’s entirely possible for the same food to benefit our health in some ways and harm it in others.Different studies can reflect that fact and be perfectly legitimate.

My solution?

• Find a trustworthy, trained and unbiased source that continually reviews and explains the whole body of evidence on a food. (NutritionFacts.org, with more than 200 trained researchers, remains my go-to choice).

• Let the evidence dictate whether the food will benefityou.

Finally, trust your body to tell you if it’s working!

(More on my olive oil research tomorrow)

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